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15 December 2004 @ 12:36 pm
Specialized Book Challenge  
The advent of the information age was supposed to herald a new era of specialized, on-demand information services. Books, music, and other media that fit our interests would be available at our fingertips. Super-specialized information would be the norm.

The book that most closely resembles this paradigm for me was Mathematics in a Postmodern Age: A Christian Perspective - the book is about exactly what I thought it would be about, and it's written for exactly the audience I thought it would be. That topic and audience are both exceptionally small; nevertheless, the book serves its purpose admirably.

My challenge to you is this: tell me about a book that is probably not of interest to more than a few thousand people in the world. If it's a good book, so much the better.
 
 
 
Josh Jacksonpturing on December 15th, 2004 11:36 am (UTC)
The Idle Warriors by Kerry Thornley

A book by Kerry Thornley, co-author of the Principia Discordia on Lee Harvey Oswald, written before the Kennedy Assassination
Scottscott_lynch on December 15th, 2004 11:42 am (UTC)
Move Under Ground, by Nick Mamatas. It's about Jack Kerouac battling the rise of Cthulhu and other dark powers in the middle of last century. No, I'm not kidding. Beats vs. Eldritch Horrors.

According to Nick's lj, the book has sold somewhere between 950 and 1100 copies. Of which two are mine.
Stable Strangeletcuthalion on December 15th, 2004 12:14 pm (UTC)
I thought the point of the above was that this was made possible by the fact that you don't have to print a book to get the information out.
Hoc Est Qui Sumusdiscoflamingo on December 15th, 2004 01:04 pm (UTC)
It doesn't have to be a dead tree book.
Nightwalkerhalfawake on December 15th, 2004 02:32 pm (UTC)

The advent of the information age was supposed to herald a new era of specialized, on-demand information services. Books, music, and other media that fit our interests would be available at our fingertips. Super-specialized information would be the norm.


This reminds me of what I read in the paper today. Google is going to be undertaking a remarkably hard challenge: brining all the books from University of Michigan and Stanford University online in a searchable format.

I'm enough of a computer/english geek that this is something that I'd pay a monthy fee to be able to use. I'm sure I'm not the only one - that's probably why Google is doing this. New stuff like this is why they're so successful.